Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Those Who Wrongfully Judged this Fisherman Because of His Appearance Missed Out on a HUGE Blessing!

Like many inspiring movies and books, this short story may be fictional. However, the impact that this work will have on its readers is very real. Enjoy!


The Old Fisherman

by Mary Bartels Bray



Our house was directly across the street from the clinic entrance of Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. We lived downstairs and rented the upstairs rooms to out patients at the clinic. One summer evening as I was fixing supper, there was a knock at the door. I opened it to see a truly awful looking man. "Why, he's hardly taller than my eight-year-old," I thought as I stared at the stooped, shriveled body. But the appalling thing was his face -- lopsided from swelling, red and raw. Yet his voice was pleasant as he said, "Good evening. I've come to see if you've a room for just one night. I came for a treatment this morning from the eastern shore, and there's no bus 'til morning."

 

He told me he'd been hunting for a room since noon but with no success, no one seemed to have a room. "I guess it's my face...I know it looks terrible, but my doctor says with a few more treatments..."

For a moment I hesitated, but his next words convinced me: "I could sleep in this rocking chair on the porch. My bus leaves early in the morning."

I told him we would find him a bed, but to rest on the porch. I went inside and finished getting supper. When we were ready, I asked the old man if he would join us. "No thank you. I have plenty." And he held up a
brown paper bag.

When I had finished the dishes, I went out on the porch to talk with him a few minutes. It didn't take a long time to see that this old man had an oversized heart crowded into that tiny body. He told me he fished for
a living to support his daughter, her five children, and her husband, who was hopelessly crippled from a back injury.

He didn't tell it by way of complaint; in fact, every other sentence was preface with a thanks to God for a blessing. He was grateful that no pain accompanied his disease, which was apparently a form of skin cancer. He thanked God for giving him the strength to keep going. At bedtime, we put a camp cot in the children's room for him. When I got up in the morning, the bed linens were neatly folded and the little man was out on the porch. He refused breakfast, but just before he left for his bus, haltingly, as if asking a great favor, he said, "Could I please come back and stay the next time I have a treatment? I won't put you out a bit. I can sleep fine in a chair." He paused a moment and then added, "Your children made me feel at home. Grownups are bothered by my face, but children don't seem to mind." I told him he was welcome to come again. And on his next trip he arrived a little after seven in the morning. As a gift, he brought a big fish and a quart of the largest oysters I had ever seen. He said he had shucked them that morning before he left so that they'd be nice and fresh. I knew his bus left at 4:00 a.m. and I wondered what time he had to get up in order to do this for us.

In the years he came to stay overnight with us there was never a time that he did not bring us fish or oysters or vegetables from his garden. Other times we received packages in the mail, always by special delivery; fish and oysters packed in a box of fresh young spinach or kale, every leaf carefully washed. Knowing that he must walk three miles to mail these, and knowing how little money he had made the gifts doubly precious. When I received these little remembrances, I often thought of a comment our next-door neighbor made after he left that first morning. "Did you keep that awful looking man last night? I turned him away! You can lose roomers by putting up such people!" Maybe we did lose roomers once or twice. But oh! If only they could have known him, perhaps their illnesses would have been easier to bear. I know our family always will be grateful to have known him; from him we learned what it was to accept the bad without complaint and the good with gratitude to God.

Recently I was visiting a friend, who has a greenhouse, as she showed me her flowers, we came to the most beautiful one of all, a golden chrysanthemum, bursting with blooms. But to my great surprise, it was growing in an old dented, rusty bucket. I thought to myself, "If this were my plant, I'd put it in the loveliest container I had!" My friend changed my mind. "I ran short of pots," she explained, "and knowing how beautiful this one would be, I thought it wouldn't mind starting out in this old pail. It's just for a little while, till I can put it out in the garden."

She must have wondered why I laughed so delightedly, but I was imagining just such a scene in heaven. "Here's an especially beautiful one," God might have said when he came to the soul of the sweet old fisherman. "He won't mind starting in this small body." All this happened long ago -- and now, in God's garden, how tall this lovely soul must stand.

Monday, July 28, 2014

New tech lets hair reflect any colour

Welcome to Imgur!

You've found your new Int

Welcome to Imgur!

You've found your new Internet home. Be forewarned, time has been known to quicken in this realm.ernet home. Be forewarned, time has been known to quicken in this realm.
Afghan offering tea to American soldier.
Parents, now elderly, still searching for their missing daughter.
Starving African kid and a missionary holding hands, Africa.
Inside a gas chamber, Auschwitz - Germany.
Surgeon after performing a (successfully) 23 hour long heart transplant. His assistant is sleeping in the corner.
Father and Son (1949-2009).
Diego Fraz√£o Torquato, fiddles while in tears at the funeral of his teacher, the man responsible for changing violent and traumatized kids through music, Rio de Janeiro.
Russian soldier playing an abandoned piano, Chechnya, 1994.
Young man just discovered that his brother was killed.
Christians protecting Muslims with a human shield during a prayer, Cairo, Egypt - 2011.
Firefighter giving water to thirsty koala during the devastating wildfires, Australia - 2009.
Terri Gurrola sees her daughter for the first time after serving 7 months in Iraq.
Homeless waiting for food to distributed outside a mosque, New Delhi, India.
Zanjeer, the dog who saved thousands of lives during the explosions in Mumbai - 1993, detecting more than 3,329 pounds of RDX explosives, 600 detonators, 249 hand grenades and 6,406 rounds of ammunition. Even police attended his funeral.
Man jumps to his death from the World Trade Center during the 9/11 attacks.
Child trying to bring his alcoholic father home.
Couple die hugging in the rubble of a collapsed factory.
Sunset viewed from Mars.
Five year old boy smoking at a party in the gypsy community of St. Jacques, Perpignan, southern France. It is quite common for kids to smoke in St. Jacques.
Hhaing Yu, 29, cries to see the destruction caused by the cyclone that hit Myanmar in 2008.
Dog waits for his owner to return after two days of flooding in Rio de Janeiro, 2011.
Son runs to hug his father for the last time before WWII.
Russian veteran finds the tank he drove during WWII.
The power of a flower.
Woman cries in the middle of the city of Natori, destroyed after the earthquake and tsunami hit Japan in March 2011.
Graves that unite a Protestant and Catholic couple in the Netherlands (1888).
Owner finds his dog after the tornado that destroyed Alabama in March 2012, USA.
Demonstration of the condom use in a public market in Jayapura, capital of Papua, 2009.
Russians soldiers about to begin the battle of Kursk in July 1943.

Man saving baby cats during a flood that struck

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Brain switch that turns off consciousness discovered

Will you live another 10 years? New health calculator wants to tell you 

The chart, developed by Swiss researchers, predicts whether a 75-year-old will live an extra decade. It takes into account lifestyle choices like fruit consumption and exercise frequency.


NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

Wednesday, July 9, 2014, 6:30 PM

Monday, July 7, 2014


Garlic
12 Indian foods that cut fat (IndiaPicture)
You don't have to acquire a taste for olive oil, seaweed or soya to maintain a low-fat, healthy diet. Indian cuisine can be healthy too, if it's cooked with oil and ingredients that take care of your heart and health. 

Ayurveda suggests you include all tastes — sweet, sour, salty, pungent, bitter and astringent — in at least one meal each day, to help balance unnatural cravings. Here are 12 foods that can help you lose weight and gain health:

Turmeric : Curcumin, the active component of turmeric, is an object of research owing to its properties that suggest they may help to turn off certain genes that cause scarring and enlargement of the heart. Regular intake may help reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or bad cholesterol and high blood pressure, increase blood circulation and prevent blood clotting, helping to prevent heart attack.

Cardamom : This is a thermogenic herb that increases metabolism and helps burn body fat. Cardamom is considered one of the best digestive aids and is believed to soothe the digestive system and help the body process other foods more efficiently.

Chillies : Foods containing chillies are said to be as foods that burn fat. Chillies contain capsaicin that helps in increasing the metabolism. Capsaicin is a thermogenic food, so it causes the body to burn calories for 20 minutes after you eat the chillies.

Curry leaves : Incorporating curry leaves into your daily diet can help you lose weight. These leaves flush out fat and toxins, reducing fat deposits that are stored in the body, as well as reducing bad cholesterol levels. If you are overweight, incorporate eight to 10 curry leaves into your diet daily. Chop them finely and mix them into a drink, or sprinkle them over a meal.

Garlic : An effective fat-burning food, garlic contains the sulphur compound allicin which has anti-bacterial effects and helps reduce cholesterol and unhealthy fats.

Mustard oil : This has low saturated fat compared to other cooking oils. It has fatty acid, oleic acid, erucic acid and linoleic acid. It contains antioxidants, essential vitamins and reduces cholesterol, which is good for the heart.

Cabbage : Raw or cooked cabbage inhibits the conversion of sugar and other carbohydrates into fat. Hence, it is of great value in weight reduction.

Moong dal : The bean sprouts are rich in Vitamin A, B, C and E and many minerals, such as calcium, iron and potassium. It is recommended as a food replacement in many slimming programmes, as it has a very low fat content. It is a rich source of protein and fibre, which helps lower blood cholesterol level. The high fibre content yields complex carbohydrates, which aid digestion, are effective in stabilising blood sugar and prevent its rapid rise after meal consumption.

Honey : It is a home remedy for obesity. It mobilises the extra fat deposits in the body allowing it to be utilised as energy for normal functions. One should start with about 10 grams or a tablespoon, taken with hot water early in the morning.

Buttermilk : It is the somewhat sour, residual fluid that is left after butter is churned. The probiotic food contains just 2.2 grams of fat and about 99 calories, as compared to whole milk that contains 8.9 grams fat and 157 calories. Regular intake provides the body with all essential nutrients and does not add fats and calories to the body. It is thus helpful in weight loss.

Millets : Fibre-rich foods such as millets - jowar, bajra, ragi, etc - absorb cholesterol and help increase the secretion of the bile that emulsifies fats.
Cinnamon and cloves: Used extensively in Indian cooking, the spices have been found to improve the function of insulin and to lower glucose, total cholesterol, LDL and triglycerides in people with type 2 diabetes.